Category Archives: זיונים במסיבה

    זיון בבית ספר סקס עם תחת גדול

    זיון בבית ספר סקס עם תחת גדול

    Patrons can find the all-Hebrew version of this episode on http: From "One could think" to "without thinking twice" and "think about it", this episode teaches all the thought-related expressions you can, well, think of.

    Al mi at hoshevet? Ma hashavta le-atsmecha, ma hashavt le-atsmech? It is used for all things caring, like: Ken, ha-emet ichpat li - Do you mind? Az im ichpat lachem - So if you pl. This episode is dedicated to our dear listener Naomi Wrubel who passed away last week in NY. Today we are covering the root shavar, which gives Hebrew its words for break, broke, broken. There are plenty of unexpected phrases to learn with this root, one of which is not for kids, so please listen to the episode without them first.

    How do you say Thai food in Hebrew? You'll find it on Patreon. New words and expressions: Ta'im lecha, ta'im lach, ta'im lachem — Is it tasty for you? Streetwise Hebrew Episode Halom is a dream in Hebrew, plural, Halomot. The Tel Aviv municipality launched a new campaign to encourage people to pick up after their dogs. But it has another meaning in the Tel Avivi gay lingo. What does it mean? It has to do with separation, borders and partitions, so you can imagine how popular it is here in the Middle East.

    But it has more meanings, for example at the hair stylist, in a stadium or even on a banana peel. Hitchalakta al ha-sechel - Are you out of your mind? Almost everybody knows the word chutzpah, audacity, brash behaviour. When is it positive and when is it negative? What do Hebrew speakers use as fillers? And what did we borrow from Arabic? Looking to support the show? Learn how on Patreon. Like Streetwise Hebrew on Facebook and Instagram. Want Guy to talk about a pressing Hebrew issue?

    Find him at StreetWiseHebrew. Learn why this is important, especially for people who want to improve their Hebrew. Today Guy talks about "around", "about", "8-ish" and more. Ken, mashu kaze — So at eight? Shmone tesha kaze — When should I come? Tavi kacha 20 — How many boxes do you want? Gay marriage is new to the world, and Hebrew, a gender-based language, has to face the music and find new ways to talk about it.

    On this episode, Guy talks about an email from a married gay listener. Looking for the Hebrew versions of our episodes or other Patron-only content? Want to see more Hebrew gems? Guy's recent Skype chat with Patrons covered, among other things, California's wildfires and Hebrew podcasts produced by the Israeli Broadcasting Corporation. Want to join our Skype chat next month? Ma shava kazo ahava? Congratulations Arabic lesson by Maha Want to see more Hebrew gems?

    Hu ashkara amar lach et ze? Everybody is going somewhere for the high holidays here in Israel! This is a good opportunity to talk about trips, passengers, driving, and other key Hebrew words. How do you help someone park in a tight parking spot? Life in Israel is always exciting! Often we meet weird people and encounter strange situations. How do we talk about these things?

    What do we tell our best friends after stepping out from the wierdest meeting ever? This week, Guy teaches a few handy expressions with it. What do you say to someone who is mansplaining to you?

    North Korea Want to see more Hebrew gems? Sometimes one needs to whine 'lekater' and to go over the top. Israelis love to complain and use words like inferno, hell, nightmare, torture, and other flowery terms to describe another horrible queue at the bank. How do we use it in this day and age and how do we differentiate between a platonic friend and a serious partner? Ben ha-zoog, Ha-ben zoog — The partner m. This episode is all about the nuances of an interesting word for all these contexts.

    Yona Atari — Wikipedia Heb. Ili Gorlitski Wikpedia Heb. StreetWise Hebrew gets scientific: Meant for listeners who want to develop their advanced language skills, these episodes are entirely in Hebrew. Have a listen and let us know what you think. Should we keep it going? Four years ago, we aired our first show, and this month, in August , we are celebrating more than 1. So you went to buy clothes in a Tel Avivi shop. Yesh et ze be-mida yoter gdola? It's so hot in Tel Aviv, you cannot believe it.

    But if you want to say, "I am hot", don't translate directly from English to Hebrew. Listen to this episode first. You'll understand in a minute. A teenager in central Tel Aviv said something to his friend on the phone that made Guy think: How do we say 'whiner' and 'to whine' in Hebrew? Today's episode is about the word 'bachyan' and its variations. How do you tell someone not to do something in Hebrew?

    How do we give it a boost to emphasize what we really mean? We can also say 'nehmad,' but in fact mean the opposite! And what do we say about a waiter who is 'too nice'? Guy gives us the nuances of 'nehmad' in this week's episode. Ach be-kupat holim nisa lehathil iti o she-hu stam haya nehmad?

    Eich ladaat im hu stam nehmad o ba-keta? Rak le-dodim ule-dodot — To whom were we nice kids? Hamuda — Sweetie f. The word 'lidfok' in Hebrew is to knock or hit. As you might imagine, it means some more explicit things too. This episode is not child friendly! Guy nearly gets lost in the possibilities, and he even finds a Yiddish connection. But don't take his word for it! We always talk about what's around the corner or why it's a bad idea to cut them, but never the corner itself.

    So on this episode, Guy gives corners, 'pinot' in Hebrew, the attention they deserve! So you're shopping around for a short-sleeved shirt, and stop for an espresso. Or the boss says don't take shortcuts, but a friend's constant adventures stresses you out so much it practically shortens your life! Ken, katsar aval — Do you f. The melodies of a language, Guy says, are equally as important.

    Think you already know Hebrew inside out? Someone cut you in the line at a Tel Avivi market, just stepped right in front. What do you say to put them back in their place?

    That is, back behind you in the queue. Some say kissing is a universal language. But what about giving passionate French smooches or just a peck in Hebrew? Guy divulges the details.

    Let's face it; you don't want to watch that movie your friends are going to see. Slicha, aval pahot mat'im li karega — Sorry, it's less convenient for me right now.

    Pahot — Do you feel like watching a movie? Pahot hitchabarti — How was the movie? Why did the video become so viral? What exactly is the funny ending 'habai-ta,' if the word 'bayit' means home? Host Guy Sharett has returned home!

    Listen to the most educational snippets of that chat guided by our studio manager Itai. The root of the word can be expressed in a plethora of ways, so host Guy Sharett teaches us how. Nasu be'atsmechem — If you guys don't believe it, try it yourselves. Lo, asuk — Wanna meet now spontaneously? No, I am busy. So you're in Israel. How do you tell someone to "wait a minute" or "hold on a second? We use it to talk about the rain, internet downloads, mocking our friends, taking shots of alcohol, and more raunchy terms you should definitely know - which is why this episode isn't suitable for younger listeners.

    Make sure you listen well! The episode is short and sweet. So you just saw the coolest concert, and then your friend made you the best soup you've ever tasted. Sometimes you just need to tell the world. But how do you do it in Hebrew? Zehu — May I have a bit more? Eifo ani yachol limtso Kama ya'ale li — How much will it cost me…?

    Efshar be-tashlumim — Can I pay in installments? How do we use it, and what happens when we add it to mashehu, "something," or mishehu, "someone"? On this week's episode, Guy teaches the words you need to know when surfing the web. Any guesses of how to say "to google" in Hebrew? I will become a fluent Hebrew speaker. But how do we say 'become' in Hebrew? Arabic — What's happened? Arabic — What's happened with you? They get juicy - want a bite? Efshar lishol ma ata ose kan? Exclusive Content for Patrons Does your Hebrew improve after a couple "lechayims"?

    Exclusive Content for Patrons. It's how journalists receive the latest news updates, it's how sports teams arrange lifts for upcoming matches, it's how school parents communicate about homework, and, of course, it's how friends plan their weekend get-together.

    Today host Guy Sharett answers all these questions and more, with tips, tongue-twisters and a touch of socio-linguistics! Hamudim — C ute pl.

    One of the first words Israeli children learn is "kacha" - "like this" - especially when they keep asking "lama? You may even have been told "kacha" by your Hebrew teacher when you asked too many grammar questions. Today host Guy Sharett answers all your questions about "kacha," and gives some examples of how it pops up in Israeli slang. But it can also mean "he claimed" or "complained. We cover everything from basketball, to math, beer and music, plus we even get to hear some iconic Israeli poetry.

    How do you deal with these people? What should you say to them in Hebrew? Efshar lachshov mi at — One might think you were someone lit. What an exaggeration, who do you think you are? Today we're getting negative. Double negative, in fact. So, unlike in English, we use two negation words.

    Oh, and while we're learning, we also get to listen to some beautiful French and Brazilian songs. What did you gain from it? How much was it in the end? In this, "Part 3" of the chat, we hear different ways to say how tired we are in Hebrew, and our Patrons tell us how difficult they think Hebrew is to learn compared to other languages. Part 1; Part 2. In this, "Part 2" of the chat, we hear some small anecdotes from our patrons' daily lives, including start-up secrets and server mishaps, and Guy explains some grammatical points as we go along.

    Over the next three weeks we'll be airing pieces of the Skype chat host Guy Sharett had with some of our Patrons in March.

    In this, part 1 of the chat, we meet the Patrons and hear about some of their experiences visiting Tel Aviv and trying to use their Hebrew. In a country where everybody tells you what to do, how to do it, and when, it's only natural the word "adif" - "it's preferable" - would be a word you hear every day. Host Guy Sharett explains how we use "keta" to say that we're not into something, or to tell our friend how un funny they're being.

    Get ready for a feel-good episode! Today's episode teaches you how to do something very useful on the Israeli streets - to stop someone who's talking at you and tell them "listen! Today's episode is all about "mazal tov. And what do you say when you're not sure if it's a boy or a girl, in a gender-based language like Hebrew?

    Host Guy Sharett has all the answers. One of the first things we learn to say in a foreign language is "how much does it cost? We have to know how to "charge" as well. Kama ze ole lanu? Asking for the bill is one of the most important things to learn in any language. But "heshbon," in Hebrew, is about much more than just settling the account.

    On this episode, host Guy Sharett explains how Israelis do self-reflection, how they break even Are you playing by the "klalim"? Host Guy Sharett takes us through all the rules, regulations, generalizations, and exceptions.

    In Hebrew we like to set meetings, rendezvous, appointments. Eich kov'im ma yihye godel taktsiv ha-medina? Haiyten — You were pl. The root "nun-pei-lamed" is all about falling - "lipol" means "to fall. If you want to listen to part 2, or even take part in the next live chat, head over to our Patreon page. From family members to boxing matches to intestines.

    The word "miss" has many meanings in English: You can miss a bus, a lesson, miss someone, miss the point, and much more. Hebrew does not use one verb for all of the above, and some acrobatics is needed. Host Guy Sharett explains. You probably know that ochel kasher is "kosher food. And what does the verb lehakhshir mean, and how is it all related to talent? Host Guy Sharett explains all. And how is the first name Raphael related?

    In this episode Guy Sharett explains all things medical. How would I know? Sometimes we're just "in basa" - in a state of annoyance, not really angry, but just bummed. From telling the time, to sports, to fashion, "hetsi" gets everywhere. But when do we say "hetsi" and when "hatsi"? Listen to find out. The Middle East is a place where people swear "on the honor of their mom" without thinking too much. Even advanced learners have difficulties with the pagash-nifgash verb forms, both meaning 'he met.

    The word for "support" - "tmicha" - is vastly used in Hebrew, mainly in the context of tech support. The verb is "litmoch. The word "dkira" - "stabbing" - is unfortunately becoming the soundtrack to our lives here in Israel at the moment.

    We promise a special sanity episode once things get back to normal. How do we sleep in Hebrew? TV2 shnatz Shnat Tsohorayim Clip: This is a good opportunity to learn how to thank someone profusely and cynically in Hebrew. Hebrew has this interesting structure: Verb "haya" past tense of "to be" plus a conjugated verb in the present, like "hayiti holech. He's made aliyah since then. How are you supposed to know which one it is?

    At yechola laazor li bevakasha? It was really fun. Like many kids, they suffer there because they want to fit in in the new country and because often the teachers are not really enthusiastic about teaching language, and in the case of Hebrew, there are rabbis at Talmud Torah schools in New York who teach Hebrew with a Yiddish accent and not contemporary Israeli slang like we learn here.

    TV1 Police Chief report Ma kara, ma kara? Az ma od kore itach — So what else is happening with you? TLV1 Radio, the home of our podcast, has a few more shows for you to check out. They all focus on Israel in one way or another. You can find the podcast at tlv1. How come some mistakes in a foreign language sound worse than others? How do we ask for more milk, for an encore or for another goal in a football game? Host Guy Sharett shares his top 10 tips on how to rejuvenate your linguistic inner self: Find stuff you love and read about it in Hebrew.

    Israeli National Radio in 14 languages 4. Saying new words out loud. Talk to the Google Translate App. Tandem with a Hebrew speaker. Magazines, children books, newspaper, websites, inflight magazines. Playlist and clips used: All Chakras - Meditation, Balancing and Tuning How do we give in Hebrew?

    And what is 'latet barosh' - 'to give in the head'? Slicha, mi natan lachem lehikanes le-po? Excuse me, who let you in here? What about just "pit'om" by itself? StreetWise Hebrew gets geeky!

    Making your Hebrew sound truly conversational is an important but tricky skill. How do you start a new topic, for instance? How do you urge someone to get to the point? What sounds do you make when you nod attentively? And how do you show shock, excitement, or enthusiasm? Ma od bikasht —? Az ma od —? Az ma od kore itach —? Ma im ha-tiyul —? Tagidi, ma chutz mize —? Yad means hand, but also so much more. Lior Peleg, our beloved editor and technical producer, is leaving us.

    The Greek philosopher Plato taught us that knowledge is recollection. Well, if that's the case, you'll come out of today's episode pretty smart! And what does a secretary have to do with it? Host Guy Sharett helps us to remember. Lots of Hebrew learners find it hard to discern between 'speak,' 'talk,' and 'tell' when they talk with their Israeli friends, colleagues, classmates, and flatmates.

    It means situation, state, or condition, but it can be used in lots of different idioms: Guy Sharett explains all. Need, necessity, consumption, consumer, and much more. Guy also tells us about a new word he found in the dictionary - kids, don't try this at home! This week, we dedicate our show to Paris and France, as a tribute to our Parisians friends who are going through a difficult phase.

    A tout de suite! Everyone in Israel is talking about March Any idea what's happening on that date? There is one thing we Israelis dread above all: Being a 'fraier' - a 'sucker.

    Guy Sharett tells us more I described these as "opposite sides of the world. However, the places where the different eggs were found are still what could be described as "opposite sides of the world.

    I wanted to use a globe representing the cretaceous, but couldn't find one. Olson, Dinosaurs past and present volume II pp. William Lane Craig is a master of crowing over the essentially irrelevant robust nature of certain methodologies while simultaneously misapplying such methods to draw his desired and erroneous conclusions.

    In academic circles, anyone who spends a disproportionate amount of their time exhausting the praises of the reliability of logical methods as Craig does , reeks of being a bullshit merchant as its well known the whole methodology is subject to GIGO Garbage in, Garbage out. Craig has 'five pillars' by which he 'proves' Christianity. He claims that everything that begins to exist has a cause.

    Well if we didn't have a few hundred years of scientific discovery under our belt showing the universe does not mold itself around human intuitions, he might have a point: The smaller and higher in energy you get, the less intuition serves you satisfactorily. And whats the problem Craig wants to apply his 'intuition' and 'inductive reasoning' to?

    He seems to expect that even though we have no way of currently defining such a state it's an unknown, a gap in knowledge , that his intuitive reasoning will serve him well. You don't need to know much about science to realize that's almost a pointless exercise. Apply intuition to quantum mechanics, and you will fail. These are of course the scientific objections to Craigs arguments.

    Craig is of course merely a layman when it comes to science. A point I only bring up as Craig persistently brings up such appeals to authority when suggesting his critics are not serious because they do not possess a degree in Philosophy. Ozmoroid has some of the best vids out there for those who really want to get to grips with relativity!

    Sign up for Lionel's Newsletter and Truth Warrior manifestos. Twitter — Instagram — Periscope — Email — lionel lionelmedia. US Copyright Law allows people to use limited portions of a copyrighted work for the purpose of commentary, criticism, and or parody. Anyone who seeks to flag or DMCA this video, be warned: And that was over 2, subscribers ago.

    Creationists habitually indulge in pseudoscience, effectively acting as intellectually corrosive agents that detract from our ability to pursue progress. Ironically, the very same science that they misuse and abuse are the ones that allow them and the rest of us to maintain happy, healthy lives. The very same technology that they take for granted, and even use to spread their vile filth, is responsible for their lives of opulence and opportunity- opportunity that many of them actively squander, which is something that they try to have the rest of us do.

    Also ironic is that they do this out of a misplaced sense of righteousness, when in fact their actions have always been, at least in large part, responsible for the retardation of knowledge and progress in society. No example, in my opinion, serves better than the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics at showcasing just how intellectually bankrupt these individuals are. They lack not only a cursory education in the matters on which they feel qualified to pontificate, but integrity as well, because no matter how many times one corrects a creationist's mistakes, it will continue to parrot the same old lies and fallacies as it always has.

    Indeed, by the time they finish watching this video, creationists will probably dismiss it out of hand and continue using the 2nd Law nonargument even though they know it's wrong. That's because the goal of creationism isn't to accumulate knowledge- it's to affirm a preexisting bias regardless of how many facts stand in the way.

    But hey, defending the words of the book of our Lord is always a moral thing to do, right?

    זיון בבית ספר סקס עם תחת גדול The root "nun-pei-lamed" is all about falling - "lipol" means "to fall. How do we use this verb? The women around Moses. Shabbat Candles ," Breger, Jennifer. Lookstein Center Library of Educational Resources.

    The watcher at the window: Von Sarai zu Sarah: At home with the goddess. Die biblische Vorstellungswelt und deren geschlechterpolitische Dimension: Prophetische Frauen am Zweiten Tempel? The Shulamite is not the Woman of Valor. La visione biblica del maschio e della femmina. Violence and the Old Testament. Menstrual impurity and innovation in Leviticus Sexual hospitality in the Hebrew Bible?. A secular, Jewish, feminist look at the Bible. Reading the silence of women in Genesis Observations on women in the genealogies of 1 Chronicles Family in the Wisdom literature.

    Tochter Zion im Jeremiabuch: Can daughters be sons? The daughters of Zelophehad in patriarchal and imperial society. Journeying with Sarah in a chorus of voices. Everyday life in biblical Israel: Sex and violence in prophetic marriage metaphors. The semantics of taboo: Sarah and Hagar as female representations of identity and difference. The woman in childbirth of John Als das Leben anfing Stadtfrau Zion und Erzmutter Sarah: Feministische Anthropologie des Ersten Testaments: Nehama on women and womanhood.

    African American women and the Bible. The female imagery in the Book of Hosea: Wide gaps, narrow escapes: I am known as Rahab, the broad. Genesis matriarchs engage feminism.

    Is incest with a daughter permissible? The birth narrative as female counterpart to covenant. Die Sklavin als Ehefrau: Between tradition and modernity: Negotiating the frame for viewing the death of Jezebel. From household to house of Yahweh: Having their space and eating there too: Feminist hermeneutics and evangelical concerns: The valiant woman, "gini sineti", and the redaction of the Book of Proverbs.

    A portrait of Rebecca: At the threshing floor: Letters to the editor of Genesis. Una rilettura del libro di Ruth alla luce del femminismo ebraico.

    The woman mataphor of Ezekiel 16 and Reading abused female bodies in the Bible: Amsterdamse Cahiers voor Exegese van de Bijbel en zijn Tradities 19 Biblical woman, caught between father and husband. The household in ancient Israel and early Judaism. If Esther had not been that beautiful: Spoken words, voiced silence: Wisdom literature and ecofeminism. Horst, Pieter Willem van der. Het graf van de profetes Hulda in de joodse traditie.

    Leung Lai, Barbara M.. Making sense of the biblical portrait: What really happened to Dinah: A feminist analysis of Genesis From Jezebel to Esther: Lovers and raisin cakes: Weisheit und Lebensart Israels in der Perserzeit. What if Judges had been written by a Philistine? Reflections on the suffering of Rayna Batya and the success of the daughters of Zelophehad. Religious canon and literary identity. Into another scene of choices: Bekkum, Wout Jacques van.

    Eve and the Matriarchs: Women storytellers in ancient Israel. Mothers, sons and heroic infertility: Is Gomer the woman in Hosea 3? Feminist study of the Old Testament. Ten things every feminist should know about the Song of Songs. The authority of Miriam: Does the law of Exodus The voice of the turtle: The souls that they made: Michal, the barren wife. Vom Prophetinnenwort zum Prophetenbuch: Jewish readings of Abigail and Bathsheba, both ancient and modern.

    Frauenstimmen im Alten Testament. A holy of holies: Margins, methods, and metaphors: Wayward women and broken promises: Positioning the wife of Jeroboam 1 Kings The daughters of Tzlafchad: Die Gerechtigkeit der Sophia: To bear, to teach: The liberated woman of valor.

    Maria, "Figlia di Sion": The silent women of Yehud: Unveiling Esther as a pragmatic radical rhetoric. One man, or all humanity? A question in the anthropology of Genesis 1. Dressed to be killed: Connected by marriage, adultery and violence: Society of Biblical Literature: Bibelarbeit zu Abigajil 1. The daughters of your people: To shame or not to shame: Esther politicised in a personal context: Is there a place for women in the theology of the Psalms?

    An investigation into the female imagery of the ancient Hebrew Psalter. The strange face of wisdom in the New Testament: Reading strategies and the story of Ruth.

    Hiding behind the naked women in Lamentations: Women in the synagogue. Frau und Adam hebr. Love of woman and love of God: Die Vorstellung von Zeugung und Schwangerschaft im antiken Israel. Cannibal mothers and me: Veuve sans enfants dans le royaume de Juda. On Exodus 21,10 "Onah" and biblical marriage. Confronting redundancy as middle manager and wife: Frauen des Alten Testaments.

    Die Bibel in der deutschsprachigen Literatur des Narrative Analyse aus feministischer Sicht. Minimo vedemecum iconografico alla creazione della donna.

    Between ideology and tradition: Trebolle Barrera, Julio C. The treatment of women in Deuteronomy: Gedanken zum Introitus des 4. Sonntags in der Fastenzeit. Rereading the body politic: Batmartha Petermann , Ina Johanne. Desolate Jerusalem and barren matriarch: Konnte eine Witwe die "nah a lah" ihres verstorbenen Mannes erben?

    Qoheleth the "old boy" and Qoheleth the "new man": Ruth, plaidoyer en faveur de la femme. Men are from Judah, women are from Bethlehem: Das Buch der Richter: The way of women: Qoheleth, misogyny and the "Malleus Maleficarum". Virginity in the Bible. Zions Stimme in der Not. Forms of violence and the violence of forms: The seduction of Eve and feminist readings of the Garden of Eden.

    Women in Judaism 1,2 Biblical women that come in pairs: From tragedy to art and film: Frauen und Kinder nicht gerechnet. One man among a thousand, but not a woman among them all: La biblica e la mitica "Madre dei Viventi". The four wives of Jacob: A bosadi womanhood reading of Genesis She said to him, he said to her: The duality in God and man: Toxic religion and the daughters of Job.

    Frauen im Zentrum der Geschichte Israels. Wisdom literature among the witchmongers. False weights in the scales of biblical justice? Different views of women from patriarchal hierarchy to religious equality in the Book of Deuteronomy.

    The significance of "asher" in Qoh 7, Tra eros e sophia: They might be giants: Wives and daughters, bond and free: When is a widow not a widow? Guardianship provides an answer. The doom of Paradise: The cases of Bathsheba, Jezebel and Athaliah. The Northern Israelite queen mother in the Judaean court: Gott rechtfertigt sich selbst. Historical, hermeneutical, and methodological foundations. Le roi, la femme et la sagesse: The cannibal women and their judgment before the helpless king 2 Kings 6: The Book of Ruth and the possibility of a feminist canonical hermeneutic.

    Images of women in the Old Testament. The Hebrew God and his female complements. Woman wisdom and the strange woman: Le donne nei libri sapienziali. On reading Genesis Women in Judaism 1,1 Gott als Mutter in Jes 1,2. Childlessness and prayer in the Bible. Writing the "wrongness" of women: What did Laban demand of Jacob? A new reading of Genesis What will ye see in the Shulammite?

    Women, power and panopticism in the Song of Songs. Woman as divine agent in Ecclesiastes. A wealth of women: Die Frau des Bruders: Gedanken zu einem literarischen Motiv. Challenged by the text: The equality of humankind from the perspective of the creation stories in Genesis 1: Mothers and sons in ancient Israel. Le donne e i figli di Davide. Hagar, victim or villain? La ruse biblique et les femmes.

    Rachel weeping for her children: Texts in dialogue with texts: Sara, Raquel y Miriam: Machen Geburt und Monatsblutung die Frau "unrein"? What a lioness was your mother: Donne bibliche e "mondo alla rovescia" nei "Carmina Burana" 6 e Goddess, gods, men and women in Ezekiel 8.

    Bathsheba plotted, shot, and painted. The strange woman in Septuagint Proverbs. What happens to Ms Babylon in Isaiah 47, why, and who says so? Bathsheba goes bathing in Hollywood: The wife of noble character in Proverbs Der Fluch der Mutter: Kooij, Arie van der. On male and female views in Judges 4 and 5. Feminine access to Jewish sacred space: Eve in the semiotic garden.

    Im Vorzimmer der Unterwelt: The attitude to women in the Prologue of Targum Job. Gendering the discourse of display in the Hebrew Bible.

    Frauenfeindschaft im Alten Testament? Reflections on violence and pornography: The widow of Zarephath and the great woman of Shunem: The power struggle between man and woman Gen 3,16b. Levitical thought and the female reproductive cycle: Deborah and Yael in Judges 4. The ethics of biblical violence against women. The rhetoric of biblical authority: John Knox and the question of women.

    The city as woman: Racism and ethnocentrism in feminist biblical interpretation. Is there a word for the royal harem in the Bible? Unity of the Bible, unity of the Church: Die Stellung der Frau: Rizzante Gallazzi, Ana Maria.

    Vernimm, Gott, mein Gebet: Psalm 55 und Gewalt gegen Frauen. The Queen of Sheba: Die Frau im Alten Testament. Von "Huren und Heiligen": Jerusalem als Ehebrecherin in Ezechiel Rizpa und das Ritual von Gibeon. Woman wisdom in the Book of Proverbs. Die Samaritanerin am Brunnen Joh 4. Feminist reading of the Hebrew Bible: Male and female slaves in the Sabbath Year laws of Exodus Gott und die Rolle der Frau in der Bibel. Feminism and scriptural interpretation: Structure, contradiction, and "resolution" in mythology: The Vulgate Genesis and St.

    Esther, Judith, and Ruth: Status and role of female heroines in the biblical narrative. The wise women of 2 Samuel: La donna nella Bibbia: A meditation in mourning: Die Typologie der Frau in der Prophetenliteratur Israels. Ten feminine archetypes in the Jewish Bible. Die Stellung von Mann und Frau in der Tora.

    The virginity of the "almah" in Isaiah 7, Sytuacja zawodowa kobiet w dawnym Izraelu. The literary influence of "the binding of Isaac" Genesis 22 on "the outrage at Gibeah" Judges The barren woman of Psalms ,9 and the housewife: The roots of restriction: Le statut de la femme dans la Bible.

    The Jewish Woman The childless wife in Assyria and the stories of Genesis. The rape of Tamar. Das Bild der Witwe: Role of women in the Old Testament. Coats, George Wesley, Jr.. Numbers 5 and the "waters of judgement". Puntualizaciones sobre Gn 2: La mujer en la Biblia: La mujer en la Biblia. Jewish women in Eastern Europe. Critical studies of women in Jewish life: Recent literature on Jewish women. Is woman just a mutilated male? Adam and Eve in the theology of Thomas Aquinas. Jews and Moors at the crossroads: Jewish women in the Jesus movement.

    A Christian means to a "conversa" end. Sara als Bild der Tugend: Jewish aspects of the "Protoevangelium of James". From the birth of Jesus to the resurrection: Martin Luthers Sicht einer beispielhaften Frau.

    Between Qumran and Corinth: Mothers, sisters, and elders: Biblische Theologie und Gewalt gegen Frauen: Gender, Judaism, and literature: Frauen im Umfeld Jesu. The "bride" in John 3. The pro creative parables of labour and childbirth Jn 3.

    Das Wort ohne Vokale: Leviticus 12, Mary and wax: Ist Antijudaismus noch ein Thema im christlichen Feminismus?. Equal worth and gracious submission: The virile bride of Bernard of Clairvaux. Jesus, divorce, and sexuality: Christlicher Antijudaismus aus feministischer Perspektive. On the trail of a good story: The doorway into freedom: Jesus and the adulteress. Der Brief an die Gemeinden in Galatien: Der Brief an die Gemeinde in Rom: A woman reads the Gospel of Luke: Gentiles and the Davidic tradition in Matthew.

    Woman as reflected in the biblical commentaries of Cipriano de la Huerga. Aus deutscher und feministischer Perspektive: Feministische Analysen und Alternativen. In the dangerous currents of old prejudices: Ancient Jewish "responsa" in the gospels?

    Second Temple Judaism, Jesus, and women: Origine e portata della seduzione di Eva nel Corpus Paulinum 2Cor 11,3: When did the women visit the tomb?

    Sources for some temporal clauses in the Synoptic Gospels. Ruth according to Ephrem the Syrian. Wife and sister through the ages: Appropriation, reciprocity, and issues of power [Jewish and Christian feminist theology]. The liberation of illegitimacy: Medieval interpretation of Gen.

    Menstruants and the sacred in Judaism and Christianity. Rachele e il pianto della madre nella tradizione cristiana antica. La donna nella chiesa: Early Christian women and their cultural context: Medieval models of purity and sanctity: Ashkenazic women in the synagogue. The rites of water for the Jewish women of Algeria: The return to the sacred: Community, fertility, and sexuality: Mikveh for women on erev Yom Kippur. The Hollekreisch in Alsace.

    Women, ritual, and secrecy: Marriage and varying customs. Husbands, wives, and childbirth rituals. Customs of pregnancy and childbirth among Sephardic and Oriental Jews. Women and livelihoods in 1st century Palestine: American Jewish Communism and garment unionism in the s. Jewish women as providers in the generations following the expulsion from Spain.

    Gender, difference, and everyday life: Business women in the mishnaic and talmudic period. Women in Judaism 2,2 The relationship between gender and performance issues of concern to directors: The economic productivity of medieval Jewish widows. World Congress of Jewish Studies 11,B, vol.

    Spatial differences in the labour force participation of married women: Women, work and the law. A Jewish business woman of the 11th century. Pua Rakowska i jej walka o prawa kobiet: Nationalism, gender and religious education: Schooling for change in the religious world: Jewish women as learning different.

    Joining the faculty club: Jewish women academics in the United States. Examining the role of gender studies in the teaching of talmudic literature. The call to serve: Learned Jewish women in antiquity. Bessie Gotsfeld, founder of Mizrachi Women of America. Rediscovering schools for Jewish girls in tsarist Russia.

    Educating Muslim girls in Mandatory Jerusalem. Jewish women reflect on adult study. Jewish women and adult Jewish education: Di Segni, David Gianfranco. Religion, study, and contemporary politics. Assimilation ist keine Einbahnstrasse: Cohen Ioannides, Mara W.. System medytacyjny dla dziewczat w Rydze, przed Holokaustem. Pioneers of modern Jewish and religious education for girls: Patterns of education and entry into first union among American Jewish women. Women and the dialectic of spirituality in Hasidism.

    Mores and chores as determinants of the status of Jewish women in Libya. Integrating Jewish and feminist educational goals. Gender, identity, and community: Jewish university women in Germany and Austria. Sobre algumas feministas e seu destino no Egito medieval. The experience of religious fortification: Can teachers advance gender equality in society? The quest for the historical Beruriah, Rachel, and Imma Shalom. Prayer and education in the life of Jewish women. Bildung und gesellschaftliche Verantwortung: Jewish education for women: Education for Jewish girls in the East: Der Exodus von Wissenschaftlerinnen: Beyond Heder, Haskalah, and honeybees: Some parallels in the education of medieval Jewish and Christian women.

    Women and the study of Talmud. Educating for "proper" Jewish womanhood: Social History of Medicine 24,2 — Educating the "new" Jewish woman: From bourgeois Germany to Palestine: The First World War: Frauenideale und Frauenstatus in der "neuen Gesellschaft" des vorstaatlichen Israel.

    Zionist women of the s: Women, womanhood, and ethnicity in Zionist Eretz Israel. Looking forward and backward: Loyalty, belonging, and their discontents: Material remains and social relations: Women as victims of war: Hannah Meisel and the founding of the agricultural schools for young women.

    Cesarean section in the days of the Mishnah and the Talmud. No home at home: Daughters of the nation: The mercies of the court: The double or multiple image of the new Hebrew women.

    On rhetoric and commitment: Why are these women here? Clorinda Minor, from pilgrim to pioneer. The vision becomes reality: Traditional flexibility and modern strictness: The attraction of aristocratic women to Pharisaism during the Second Temple period. The struggle for equal rights for women in the early Jewish defense underground: The role of women in linguistic and narrative change: Literature by women of the first aliyah: Human being or housewife: Yemenite Jewish women between tradition and change.

    On the way to equality? From revolution to motherhood: The fringes of the margin: In search of a new female identity: Women in the defense forces. Spanish ladies from the Cairo Geniza. Israeli feminism new and old. The plough woman who cried into the pots: Seeking the local, engaging the global: Coping with the legacy of death: Unruly daughters to mother nation: Trudna historia kobiet z Rosentrasse: Russian immigrant woman in Israeli film.

    What is your story? Jewish mothers on film. Molly Goldberg as Jewish mother. Echo and voice in "Meetings with Anna". Female images in a state of war: Blowing up the Jewish mother: The construction of heroines in Holocaust films: Images of women in Holocaust films.

    The others in Israeli cinema of the s and s: Holocaust survivors, women, and Arabs. Our mothers and our sisters and our cousins and our aunts: The way she really is: My son the doctor.

    Von Frauenfiguren zu Frauenfilmen im israelischen Kino. The woman as Other in Israeli cinema. Amos Oz and Izhak ben Ner: Leah behind the veil: One clove away from a pomander ball: Del Negro, Giovanna P.. The bad girls of Jewish comedy: From the nightclub to the living room: Glikl bas Leib and the other woman. The making of a Jewish folk hero: The Worlds of S. The multiple faces of Eve: Love and death in a contemporary "dybbuk" story: The synagogue as a stage for magic. The meal of the spirits, the three Parcae and Lilith: La Jewish mama et la nourriture: From Sophie Tucker to Barbra Streisand: Jewish women entertainers as reformers.

    Sex and women in biblical narrative humor. Reading androcentrism against the grain: The JAP joke controversy: An explanation of Jewish jokes about Jewish women. Who are the wives?

    Who are the husbands? A study of marriage roles in Jewish classical folklore. Fields of Offerings A mother in Israel: Tentative thoughts that distinguish between the timely and the timeless. Women as halakhic professionals: Hormonal intervention for religious concerns: On women joining in a "zimmun". Meorot 9 26 pp. Is kinyan purchase of woman in the marriage document only a metaphor? Lectio difficilior 2 22 pp. Laws pertaining to women and sexuality in the early stratum of the "Damascus Document".

    Jewish women in the responsa of Rabbi Joseph Colon. Spirituality, textual study and gender at Nishmat: Women in Judaism 7,1 22 pp. A new view of women and Torah study in the talmudic period.

    JSIJ 9 44 pp. The relationship between Halakhic decisors and their peers as a determining factor in the acceptance of their desicions: Toward a gender critical approach to the philosophy of Jewish law Halakhah. Talking about the Jewish wedding ritual: The feminist contribution to Halakhic discourse: Women and religious change in Israel: Single women who want to have a baby. On women in rabbinic leadership positions. Meorot 8 12 pp.

    Wine from Havdalah, women and beards. Adelman, Howard Ernest Tzvi. Consent and coercion in sexual relations. The menstruant as "other" in medieval Judaism and Christianity. Feminism and Jewish law in Conservative Judaism. Women and the Reconstructionist movement.

    Toward a new tzniut. Recovery for infliction of emotional distress: Foucault and Jewish feminism: Channels of information about menstruation and sexuality among Hasidic adolescent girls. Exile, apostasy and Jewish women in the early 16th century Mediterranean basin.

    Halakhic issues presented by breast cancer. Captivity, conversion, and communal identity: Torah "aliyyot" for women — a continuing discussion. Meorot 7,1 34 pp. Male piety, female bodies: Meorot 6,2 28 pp. Married women and "tsedaqah" in medieval Jewish law: Is handshaking a Torah violation? How the "aylonit" got her sex. The voices of "Mikvah" observance. What does a father want? Guy explains it all on today's episode.

    Can women say it? Click here for the all-Hebrew version of this episode. Words and expressions discussed: Next to you is someone talking on their cellphone much too loud. Why is this root used in the word for snacks? Because they're something you can grab and eat on the go. Now grab a seat and enjoy another deliciously appetising episode of Streetwise Hebrew.

    Listen to the all-Hebrew version here: Looking for the full Hebrew version of this episode? You'll find it on Patreon at patreon. Ha-hevra ha-israelit Israeli President: But it also relates to text messages and to tradition.

    Guy explains this and more on today's episode. Efshar limsor la vaksha she-Guy hitkasher? What a pass Israeli Radio news: Patrons can find the all-Hebrew version of this episode on http: From "One could think" to "without thinking twice" and "think about it", this episode teaches all the thought-related expressions you can, well, think of.

    Al mi at hoshevet? Ma hashavta le-atsmecha, ma hashavt le-atsmech? It is used for all things caring, like: Ken, ha-emet ichpat li - Do you mind? Az im ichpat lachem - So if you pl. This episode is dedicated to our dear listener Naomi Wrubel who passed away last week in NY.

    Today we are covering the root shavar, which gives Hebrew its words for break, broke, broken. There are plenty of unexpected phrases to learn with this root, one of which is not for kids, so please listen to the episode without them first. How do you say Thai food in Hebrew? You'll find it on Patreon. New words and expressions: Ta'im lecha, ta'im lach, ta'im lachem — Is it tasty for you?

    Streetwise Hebrew Episode Halom is a dream in Hebrew, plural, Halomot. The Tel Aviv municipality launched a new campaign to encourage people to pick up after their dogs. But it has another meaning in the Tel Avivi gay lingo. What does it mean? It has to do with separation, borders and partitions, so you can imagine how popular it is here in the Middle East. But it has more meanings, for example at the hair stylist, in a stadium or even on a banana peel.

    Hitchalakta al ha-sechel - Are you out of your mind? Almost everybody knows the word chutzpah, audacity, brash behaviour. When is it positive and when is it negative? What do Hebrew speakers use as fillers?

    And what did we borrow from Arabic? Looking to support the show? Learn how on Patreon. Like Streetwise Hebrew on Facebook and Instagram. Want Guy to talk about a pressing Hebrew issue? Find him at StreetWiseHebrew. Learn why this is important, especially for people who want to improve their Hebrew.

    Today Guy talks about "around", "about", "8-ish" and more. Ken, mashu kaze — So at eight? Shmone tesha kaze — When should I come? Tavi kacha 20 — How many boxes do you want? Gay marriage is new to the world, and Hebrew, a gender-based language, has to face the music and find new ways to talk about it.

    On this episode, Guy talks about an email from a married gay listener. Looking for the Hebrew versions of our episodes or other Patron-only content? Want to see more Hebrew gems? Guy's recent Skype chat with Patrons covered, among other things, California's wildfires and Hebrew podcasts produced by the Israeli Broadcasting Corporation.

    Want to join our Skype chat next month? Ma shava kazo ahava? Congratulations Arabic lesson by Maha Want to see more Hebrew gems? Hu ashkara amar lach et ze? Everybody is going somewhere for the high holidays here in Israel! This is a good opportunity to talk about trips, passengers, driving, and other key Hebrew words. How do you help someone park in a tight parking spot? Life in Israel is always exciting! Often we meet weird people and encounter strange situations. How do we talk about these things?

    What do we tell our best friends after stepping out from the wierdest meeting ever? This week, Guy teaches a few handy expressions with it.

    What do you say to someone who is mansplaining to you? North Korea Want to see more Hebrew gems? Sometimes one needs to whine 'lekater' and to go over the top. Israelis love to complain and use words like inferno, hell, nightmare, torture, and other flowery terms to describe another horrible queue at the bank. How do we use it in this day and age and how do we differentiate between a platonic friend and a serious partner?

    Ben ha-zoog, Ha-ben zoog — The partner m. This episode is all about the nuances of an interesting word for all these contexts. Yona Atari — Wikipedia Heb.

    Ili Gorlitski Wikpedia Heb. StreetWise Hebrew gets scientific: Meant for listeners who want to develop their advanced language skills, these episodes are entirely in Hebrew. Have a listen and let us know what you think. Should we keep it going? Four years ago, we aired our first show, and this month, in August , we are celebrating more than 1. So you went to buy clothes in a Tel Avivi shop. Yesh et ze be-mida yoter gdola? It's so hot in Tel Aviv, you cannot believe it.

    But if you want to say, "I am hot", don't translate directly from English to Hebrew. Listen to this episode first. You'll understand in a minute. A teenager in central Tel Aviv said something to his friend on the phone that made Guy think: How do we say 'whiner' and 'to whine' in Hebrew? Today's episode is about the word 'bachyan' and its variations.

    How do you tell someone not to do something in Hebrew? How do we give it a boost to emphasize what we really mean? We can also say 'nehmad,' but in fact mean the opposite!

    And what do we say about a waiter who is 'too nice'? Guy gives us the nuances of 'nehmad' in this week's episode. Ach be-kupat holim nisa lehathil iti o she-hu stam haya nehmad? Eich ladaat im hu stam nehmad o ba-keta? Rak le-dodim ule-dodot — To whom were we nice kids? Hamuda — Sweetie f. The word 'lidfok' in Hebrew is to knock or hit. As you might imagine, it means some more explicit things too.

    This episode is not child friendly! Guy nearly gets lost in the possibilities, and he even finds a Yiddish connection. But don't take his word for it! We always talk about what's around the corner or why it's a bad idea to cut them, but never the corner itself. So on this episode, Guy gives corners, 'pinot' in Hebrew, the attention they deserve!

    So you're shopping around for a short-sleeved shirt, and stop for an espresso. Or the boss says don't take shortcuts, but a friend's constant adventures stresses you out so much it practically shortens your life! Ken, katsar aval — Do you f. The melodies of a language, Guy says, are equally as important.

    Think you already know Hebrew inside out? Someone cut you in the line at a Tel Avivi market, just stepped right in front. What do you say to put them back in their place? That is, back behind you in the queue. Some say kissing is a universal language. But what about giving passionate French smooches or just a peck in Hebrew? Guy divulges the details. Let's face it; you don't want to watch that movie your friends are going to see.

    Slicha, aval pahot mat'im li karega — Sorry, it's less convenient for me right now. Pahot — Do you feel like watching a movie? Pahot hitchabarti — How was the movie? Why did the video become so viral? What exactly is the funny ending 'habai-ta,' if the word 'bayit' means home? Host Guy Sharett has returned home! Listen to the most educational snippets of that chat guided by our studio manager Itai.

    The root of the word can be expressed in a plethora of ways, so host Guy Sharett teaches us how. Nasu be'atsmechem — If you guys don't believe it, try it yourselves. Lo, asuk — Wanna meet now spontaneously? No, I am busy. So you're in Israel. How do you tell someone to "wait a minute" or "hold on a second? We use it to talk about the rain, internet downloads, mocking our friends, taking shots of alcohol, and more raunchy terms you should definitely know - which is why this episode isn't suitable for younger listeners.

    Make sure you listen well! The episode is short and sweet. So you just saw the coolest concert, and then your friend made you the best soup you've ever tasted. Sometimes you just need to tell the world. But how do you do it in Hebrew? Zehu — May I have a bit more?

    Eifo ani yachol limtso Kama ya'ale li — How much will it cost me…? Efshar be-tashlumim — Can I pay in installments? How do we use it, and what happens when we add it to mashehu, "something," or mishehu, "someone"? On this week's episode, Guy teaches the words you need to know when surfing the web.

    Any guesses of how to say "to google" in Hebrew? I will become a fluent Hebrew speaker. But how do we say 'become' in Hebrew? Arabic — What's happened? Arabic — What's happened with you? They get juicy - want a bite? Efshar lishol ma ata ose kan? Exclusive Content for Patrons Does your Hebrew improve after a couple "lechayims"? Exclusive Content for Patrons. It's how journalists receive the latest news updates, it's how sports teams arrange lifts for upcoming matches, it's how school parents communicate about homework, and, of course, it's how friends plan their weekend get-together.

    Today host Guy Sharett answers all these questions and more, with tips, tongue-twisters and a touch of socio-linguistics!

    Hamudim — C ute pl. One of the first words Israeli children learn is "kacha" - "like this" - especially when they keep asking "lama? You may even have been told "kacha" by your Hebrew teacher when you asked too many grammar questions. Today host Guy Sharett answers all your questions about "kacha," and gives some examples of how it pops up in Israeli slang. But it can also mean "he claimed" or "complained. We cover everything from basketball, to math, beer and music, plus we even get to hear some iconic Israeli poetry.

    How do you deal with these people? What should you say to them in Hebrew? Efshar lachshov mi at — One might think you were someone lit. What an exaggeration, who do you think you are? Today we're getting negative. Double negative, in fact.

    So, unlike in English, we use two negation words. Oh, and while we're learning, we also get to listen to some beautiful French and Brazilian songs. What did you gain from it? How much was it in the end? In this, "Part 3" of the chat, we hear different ways to say how tired we are in Hebrew, and our Patrons tell us how difficult they think Hebrew is to learn compared to other languages.

    Part 1; Part 2. In this, "Part 2" of the chat, we hear some small anecdotes from our patrons' daily lives, including start-up secrets and server mishaps, and Guy explains some grammatical points as we go along. Over the next three weeks we'll be airing pieces of the Skype chat host Guy Sharett had with some of our Patrons in March.

    In this, part 1 of the chat, we meet the Patrons and hear about some of their experiences visiting Tel Aviv and trying to use their Hebrew. In a country where everybody tells you what to do, how to do it, and when, it's only natural the word "adif" - "it's preferable" - would be a word you hear every day. Host Guy Sharett explains how we use "keta" to say that we're not into something, or to tell our friend how un funny they're being.

    Get ready for a feel-good episode! Today's episode teaches you how to do something very useful on the Israeli streets - to stop someone who's talking at you and tell them "listen!

    Today's episode is all about "mazal tov. And what do you say when you're not sure if it's a boy or a girl, in a gender-based language like Hebrew?

    Host Guy Sharett has all the answers. One of the first things we learn to say in a foreign language is "how much does it cost? We have to know how to "charge" as well. Kama ze ole lanu? Asking for the bill is one of the most important things to learn in any language. But "heshbon," in Hebrew, is about much more than just settling the account. On this episode, host Guy Sharett explains how Israelis do self-reflection, how they break even Are you playing by the "klalim"? Host Guy Sharett takes us through all the rules, regulations, generalizations, and exceptions.

    In Hebrew we like to set meetings, rendezvous, appointments. Eich kov'im ma yihye godel taktsiv ha-medina? Haiyten — You were pl. The root "nun-pei-lamed" is all about falling - "lipol" means "to fall.

    If you want to listen to part 2, or even take part in the next live chat, head over to our Patreon page. From family members to boxing matches to intestines. The word "miss" has many meanings in English: You can miss a bus, a lesson, miss someone, miss the point, and much more.

    Hebrew does not use one verb for all of the above, and some acrobatics is needed. Host Guy Sharett explains. You probably know that ochel kasher is "kosher food. And what does the verb lehakhshir mean, and how is it all related to talent?

    Host Guy Sharett explains all. And how is the first name Raphael related? In this episode Guy Sharett explains all things medical. How would I know? Sometimes we're just "in basa" - in a state of annoyance, not really angry, but just bummed.

    From telling the time, to sports, to fashion, "hetsi" gets everywhere. But when do we say "hetsi" and when "hatsi"? Listen to find out. The Middle East is a place where people swear "on the honor of their mom" without thinking too much.

    Even advanced learners have difficulties with the pagash-nifgash verb forms, both meaning 'he met. The word for "support" - "tmicha" - is vastly used in Hebrew, mainly in the context of tech support. The verb is "litmoch. The word "dkira" - "stabbing" - is unfortunately becoming the soundtrack to our lives here in Israel at the moment. We promise a special sanity episode once things get back to normal. How do we sleep in Hebrew? TV2 shnatz Shnat Tsohorayim Clip: This is a good opportunity to learn how to thank someone profusely and cynically in Hebrew.

    Hebrew has this interesting structure: Verb "haya" past tense of "to be" plus a conjugated verb in the present, like "hayiti holech. He's made aliyah since then. How are you supposed to know which one it is? At yechola laazor li bevakasha? It was really fun. Like many kids, they suffer there because they want to fit in in the new country and because often the teachers are not really enthusiastic about teaching language, and in the case of Hebrew, there are rabbis at Talmud Torah schools in New York who teach Hebrew with a Yiddish accent and not contemporary Israeli slang like we learn here.

    TV1 Police Chief report Ma kara, ma kara? Az ma od kore itach — So what else is happening with you? TLV1 Radio, the home of our podcast, has a few more shows for you to check out. They all focus on Israel in one way or another. You can find the podcast at tlv1. How come some mistakes in a foreign language sound worse than others? How do we ask for more milk, for an encore or for another goal in a football game?

    Host Guy Sharett shares his top 10 tips on how to rejuvenate your linguistic inner self: Find stuff you love and read about it in Hebrew. Israeli National Radio in 14 languages 4. Saying new words out loud.

    Talk to the Google Translate App. Tandem with a Hebrew speaker. Magazines, children books, newspaper, websites, inflight magazines. Playlist and clips used: All Chakras - Meditation, Balancing and Tuning How do we give in Hebrew? And what is 'latet barosh' - 'to give in the head'? Slicha, mi natan lachem lehikanes le-po? Excuse me, who let you in here?

    What about just "pit'om" by itself? StreetWise Hebrew gets geeky! Making your Hebrew sound truly conversational is an important but tricky skill. How do you start a new topic, for instance?

    How do you urge someone to get to the point? What sounds do you make when you nod attentively? And how do you show shock, excitement, or enthusiasm? Ma od bikasht —? Az ma od —? Az ma od kore itach —? Ma im ha-tiyul —? Tagidi, ma chutz mize —? Yad means hand, but also so much more. Lior Peleg, our beloved editor and technical producer, is leaving us.

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